Washington DC

USA in 4 Presidential Lifetimes & Unique Jobs by State

Curated by CLAI

UNIQUE JOBS BY STATE: Washington, D.C. is truly a mecca for political scientists. The district has 120 times the number of political scientists than would be expected based on the national average. Sunny Florida is home to an unusual percentage of athletes, while Hawaii has dancers and New York has fashion designers. Nevada has 32 times more gaming supervisors than the national average. And New Jersey is, for whatever reason, home to lots of marriage and family therapists.

The United States of odd jobs (Pew Charitable Trust)

Graphic: The United States of odd jobs (Pew Charitable Trust)

USA IN 4 PRESIDENTIAL LIFETIMES: When President Obama was born in 1961, President Herbert Hoover was still alive. When Hoover was born in 1874, President Andrew Johnson was still alive. When President Johnson was born in 1808, President John Adams was still alive.  Charlie Chaplin and 50 Cent were both alive at the same time. So were the Egyptian pharaohs and the wooly mammoth. Paul Revere and Karl Marx shared a planet, just barely, as did Betty White and Alexander Graham Bell. America is only as old the lifetimes of four American presidents.

American presidential lifetimes overlapped

American presidential lifetimes overlapped (Philip Bump)

SF & DC logs most work hours. Millennials want work-me balance

Curated by CLAI

WORKING TOO MUCH? No big city in this country works as hard—or at least as many hours per week on average—as San Francisco, where people log more than 44 hours at the office each week. People in Washington D.C. and Charlotte work the second longest work weeks, tied at 43.5 hours, followed by several cities in Texas.

Meanwhile, New York City, the city that supposedly never sleeps, ranks 12th on the list, at 42.5 hours per week. However, people living in the Big Apple spend more than 6 hours each week heading to and from work, nearly an hour more than that endured by dwellers of any other large city.

Cities Where People Work the Most (New York City Comptroller, WAPO)

Cities Where People Work the Most (New York City Comptroller, WAPO)

WHAT MILLENIALS AROUND THE WORLD WANT FROM WORK…

  • BECOMING A LEADERS: Millennials are interested in becoming leaders — for different reasons. This ranged from 8% in Japan to 63% in India. Half of respondents from Central/Eastern Europe chose high future earnings as a reason to pursue leadership, while only 17% of Africans did. African Millennials seemed to care most about gaining opportunities to coach and mentor others (46%).
  • MANAGERS: in North America, Western Europe, and Africa, at least 40% of respondents said they wanted managers who “empower their employees.” Yet only about 12% of Millennials in Central/Eastern Europe and the Middle East chose that quality, instead technical expertise is the top pick.
  • WORK-LIFE BALANCE: Millennials strive for work-life balance, but this tends to mean work-me balance, not work-family balance. The dominant definition was “enough leisure time for my private life” (57%). Nearly half of respondents in every region said they would give up a well-paid and prestigious job to gain better work-life balance. Central/Eastern Europe was the exception, as 42% said they would not.
How Millennials Prioritize Life by Continent (HBR)

How Millennials Prioritize Life by Continent

 

Rich, Middle Class, & Poor Jobs. Washington DC Highest Housing Cost

Curated by CLAI

JOBS FOR RICH, MIDDLE CLASS & POOR: Looking across incomes and rankings there are a couple of interesting things to note:

  • It’s good to be the boss: Being a manager is the most common job from the 70th percentile up to the 99th.
  • Doctors and lawyers are only found in the top two brackets. (There’s a reason our grandmothers wanted us to go to med school or law school.)
  • Sales supervisors are well-represented across all groups. It’s a broad job title that applies to people making as little as $12,000 a year all the way up to six figures.
Jobs Up & Down Income Ladder

Data from 2012, adjusted for inflation. Source: IPUMS-USA, University of Minnesota; American Community Survey Credit: Quoctrung Bui/NPR

DC MOST EXPENSIVE CITY: Wait a second – is D.C. really #1 in housing costs? More than NY? Yes. Washingtonians spend more on housing and related expenses (utilities, furnishings and equipment) than New Yorkers and San Franciscans.

  1. Washington, DC
  2. San Francisco, CA
  3. New York, NY
  4. San Diego, CA
  5. Baltimore, MD
  6. Los Angeles, CA
  7. Seattle, WA
  8. Boston, MA
  9. Philadelphia, PA
  10. Chicago, IL
Most expensive cities to live in the United States

Most expensive cities to live in the United States (Credit: US Bureau of Labor Statistics)