education

Top 1% Colleges and Marriage Geographies

TOP 1% COLLEGES: At 38 colleges in America, including five in the Ivy League – Dartmouth, Princeton, Yale, Penn and Brown – more students came from the top 1% of the income scale than from the entire bottom 60%. The top 10 are: Washington University in St. Louis, Colorado College, Washington and Lee University, Colby College, Trinity College (Conn.), Bucknell University, Colgate University, Kenyon College, Middlebury College, and Tufts University.

Elite colleges that enroll the highest percentage of low- and middle-income students: University of California, Los Angeles, Emory University, Barnard College, New York University, Vassar College, Bryn Mawr College, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Miami (Fla.), Brandeis University, and Wellesley College.

Top 1 Percent Colleges

Colleges with more students from the top 1% (NYTIMES)

MARRIAGE BY GEOGRAPHY: The place where you grow up doesn’t affect only your future income, but it also affects your odds of marrying. The places that discourage marriage most tend to be cities, including San Francisco, Philadelphia and New Orleans, as well as their surrounding areas.

Nationwide, the jurisdiction with the single largest marriage-discouraging effect is Washington DC. But the New York area stands out even more. If we boiled down the list to only the country’s 50 largest counties, the top five in discouraging marriage would all be in the New York area.

New York Marriage Effect

New York Marriage Effect (NYTIMES)

Curated by CLAI

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Kids are Expensive

KIDS ARE EXPENSIVE: American families will shell out an average of $233,610 from birth through age 17 — or about $13,000 a year. The ballooning price tag, a 3% increase, comes at a time when day-care costs can exceed university tuitions and homes prices have skyrocketed to record highs. (Washington Post)

  • Families in urban areas in the Northeast, such as New York and Boston, were likely to pay even more — an average of $253,770, or roughly $14,000 a year — because of higher housing and child-care costs.
  • Lower-income families are likely to spend $212,300 per child through age 17, while higher-income families will spend more than double that, or about $454,770.
  • Families in rural areas, meanwhile, are likely to spend 24% less than their counterparts in urban areas in the Northeast.

Credit: Washington Post

PERSONALIZED LEARNING FOR 6-12 GRADES: A nationwide pilot program, one that could indicate just how deeply and how quickly the personalized-learning trend will penetrate the average classroom. Indeed, despite the buzz around personalized learning, there’s no simple recipe for success, and the common ingredients — such as adaptive-learning technology and student control over learning — can backfire if poorly implemented. (Wired)

  • One early November afternoon in an hour’s drive south of San Francisco, a class of ninth-graders sat at computers for a 45-minute session of personalized learning time. Many watched instructional videos or worked with adaptive-learning software that adjusted lessons based on each student’s proficiency. Other than a few murmured conversations and the clicking of keyboards, the only sound was mellow acoustic guitar music played on their teacher’s laptop.
  • By offloading some rote learning to a computer—such as memorizing the steps of cell division or the formulas for sine, cosine and tangent—we can make the most of the connections between teachers and kids. We want more of those interactions to be about big ideas, deeper learning and the sort of feedback that you can only get from a real, live adult.

Curated by CLAI

Maps of USA: Heartland, Mega Cities, & Corporal Punishment

AMERICA’S HEARTLANDDo big cities belong in the heartland? (If not, choose a map with “holes” in it.) Does the heartland rigidly follow state lines? Does it venture south into Texas, or east into Pennsylvania? (NYTIMES)

MEGA REGIONSMesmerizing commute maps reveal we all live in mega regions and not cities. (Wired)

CORPORAL PUNISHMENT STATES 22 states still allow corporal punishment in school: 15 expressly permit it while another 7 do not prohibit it. Corporal punishment is “the intentional infliction of pain or discomfort and/or the use of physical force upon a student with the intention of causing the student to experience bodily pain so as to correct or punish the student’s behavior.” In the 2013-2014 school year, more than 110,000 students were physically punished. (NPR)

us-states-with-corporal-punishment-in-schools

Curated by CLAI

What Is Your Stress Tolerance? How Much Do You Make?

Curated by CLAI

STRESS TOLERANCE: Are you stressed for your age, gender, education, and income?

  • You have the highest stress levels 25-34 years, with a steep drop after 55.
  • Women experience greater levels of stress.
  • Stress levels decrease with greater education and higher income.

W160401_GINO_AVERAGESTRESS

WEALTHIEST ZIP CODES: The top five zip codes in America with the highest average income probably won’t surprise you: three of the five are in New York City, while one is in Miami Beach.

  • Washington, D.C. 20510 ranks as the wealthiest zip code in the District, with an average income of $191,818.
  • Maryland, Gibson Island,  21056 has an average income of $450,012.
  • Virginia, Roanoke 24005 has an average income of $394,400
  • Florida, Miami Beach 33109 with a stunning $2,180,105 in average income.
  • New York City has the wealthiest zip code (10104), with an average income of $2,976,929.

HOW MUCH DO YOU MAKE? Nearly 73% of full-time workers aren’t comfortable with the idea of discussing their pay with anyone at work other than their boss or the HR department. Only 13% said they’d be “completely comfortable” with sharing such information more broadly, recognizing that it might offer workers better leverage in negotiations. The remaining 14% or so said they would be comfortable discussing their salaries with close colleagues, but not their wider team.

  • Women were slightly more uncomfortable than men with the idea of sharing what they make, despite what they might stand to gain from doing so. About 74.5% of the women in the sample said they were uncomfortable talking about it with anyone other than a supervisor or HR, compared with 70% of the men.
  • There was a little more variation, meanwhile, among age groups. Respondents aged 25 to 34 were most likely to welcome the idea of talking openly about their pay. 34% said they were either completely comfortable with it or would do so with close colleagues, compared to 27% of all ages surveyed.

Portlandia & Norway: Desired by the Poor, Educated, and Criminals?

Curated by CLAI

“Young people are increasingly telling themselves, ‘I’m going to move somewhere and pursue my career,’ rather than, ‘I’m going to pursue my career and go wherever it takes me.’” That line stuck with me as many of my friends and colleagues move to other cities and even countries to live. Many young Americans now have the liberty and flexibility to pick up and move wherever our heart desires because we are not worrying about just food, water, and shelter, but are in search of meaning and passion.

With that, countries like Norway have such high standards of living – their prison cells look better than a lot of dorm rooms and apartments I’ve ever lived in. Our needs are all relative to our surroundings.

Portland, Oregon: Where Work is Optional (Kelsey Dake, NYTIMES)

Portland, Oregon: Where Work is Optional (Kelsey Dake, NYTIMES)

PORTLAND: People move to New York to be in media or finance; they move to L.A. to be in show business. People move to Portland to move to Portland.

  • Portland has taken hold of the cultural imagination as, to borrow the tag line from “Portlandia,” the place where young people go to retire.
  • The city has nearly all the perks that economists suggest lead to a high quality of life — coastlines, mountains, mild winters and summers, restaurants, cultural institutions and clean air.
  • According to the sacrifice measure metric, which essentially charts how poor a person is willing to be in order to live in a particular city: Portland is near the top of the list. Even when college-educated residents get jobs there, they earn 84 cents for the average dollar earned in other cities.
  • We’re not the hungry immigrant nation we used to be. We’re more into meaning, into jobs that find fulfillment. And at least some people are willing to accept lower pay to go somewhere they care about.
  • Portland’s paradox is that it attracts so many of “the young and the restless”, that it has become a city of the overeducated and underemployed — a place where young people are, in many cases, forced into their semiretirement.
Norwegian prison art (Trond Isaksen/ Statsbygg, WAPO)

Norwegian prison art (Trond Isaksen/ Statsbygg, WAPO)

NORWEGIAN PRISONS OR HOTELS? Norway’s prisons are overcrowded, but the Scandinavian country has found a simple solution: sending some of its prisoners abroad. Up to 300 prisoners could be sent to the Netherlands, which has so few criminals that it’s about to close 19 penal facilities.

The reality of Norwegian overcrowding belies the longstanding reputation the country has had for prisons that looked more like modern art museums than penal facilities. Some Norwegian cells look even more luxurious than student dorms.