city

The Best Middle Seats & Best Cities for Work

MIDDLE SEAT REDESIGNThe Slide-Slip Seat, by Molon Labe, BMW Groups’ Designworks, and Panasonic Avionics, extends the curved armrest back to ensure the middle seater has access to at least half of its length. That also gives the middle seat’s in-flight entertainment system room to grow to a whopping 18 inches, compared to the puny 15-inch screens on other seat backs. For all this design prowess, however, this thing gets you nothing in extra legroom. Let’s see if airlines think that an uptick in passenger happiness may be worth the extra weight of, say, an extra-wide seatback entertainment system. Wired

The aviation design company’s newest concept moves middle seats back and down, giving passengers an extra 3 inches of width compared to fellow flyers. MOLON LABE

MOST ATTRACTIVE CITIES FOR WORK: the most (and least) attractive places for today’s workforce were ranked financially — salary, tax, and cost-of-living data. net purchasing power of a typical salary in each city. Similarly, the lifestyle ranking takes into account living conditions and social benefits, including physical threat and safety (e.g. violence, crime, medical), discomfort (e.g. climate, geographic isolation, cultural or psychological isolation) and inconvenience (e.g. availability of housing, recreation, goods and services, and education facilities).  For individuals, younger workers see a flatter world and prioritize international experiences and mobility for career development. 71% of Millennials desire to work abroad at some point in their career. HBR

10 Most Attractive Cities for Workers

  1. Zurich, Switzerland
  2. Geneva, Switzerland
  3. Luxembourg City, Luxembourg
  4. Munich, Germany
  5. Vienna, Austria
  6. New York City, U.S.
  7. Berlin, Germany
  8. Toronto, Canada
  9. Calgary, Canada
  10. San Francisco, U.S.

Top 10 Based on Financial Score

  1. Manama, Bahrain
  2. George Town, Cayman Islands
  3. Zurich, Switzerland
  4. Geneva, Switzerland
  5. Riyadh, Saudi Arabia,
  6. Kuwait City, Kuwait
  7. Luxembourg City, Luxembourg
  8. Macau
  9. Amman, Jordan
  10. Seattle, U.S.

Curated by CLAI

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Are You an Individualistic Wheat or Communal Rice Farmer? Big Cities are Greener Now

Curated by CLAI

WHEAT V. RICE PEOPLE: Americans and Europeans stand out from the rest of the world for our sense of ourselves as individuals. We like to think of ourselves as unique, autonomous, self-motivated, self-made.

  • Because rice paddies need standing water, a community of rice farmers needs to work together in tightly integrated ways.
  • Not wheat farmers – wheat needs only rainfall and requires substantially less coordination and cooperation. And historically, Europeans have been wheat farmers and Asians have grown rice.

LEAFING OF NEW YORK: over the last 50 or 75 or 100 years, the more developed parts of the nation’s densest big city have grown greener.

Green New York Then and Now

Manhattan, East Side: the Queensboro Bridge from East 59th Street. Older photo, 1912.

Modern Man and College Gentrification

Curated by CLAI

MODERN MAN: Because men take longer to finish college and marry later than women, they are more likely to stick around their parents’ house. In 2012, 40% of millennial men (ages 18-31) lived at home. American men earn about 19% more than women.

Adults Age 25-34 Living At Home (1983-2013)

Adults Age 25-34 Living At Home 1983-2013 (Alyson Hurt/NPR)

COLLEGE GRAD GENTRIFICATION: The more college grads, the more expensive the city, the more gentrification – less crime, better school, better restaurants, bars, museums, and art galleries. College graduates also live in the nicest cities in the country. They’re getting more benefits, even net of fact that they’re paying higher housing costs.

  • In 1980, a college graduate earned about 38% more than a worker with only a high-school diploma. By 2000, 57%. By 2011, 73%.
  • Nationwide education gentrification is at the scale of entire cities. Picture low-skilled workers increasingly excluded from Washington and San Francisco and segregated into cities like Toledo or Baton Rouge.
  • In the past, higher-wage cities attracted more workers, driving up the supply of labor and driving down the high wages that drew them to those cities in the first place, counteracting some of the inequality we see today.
  • A higher share of college graduates also yielded higher wages for workers without college degrees, likely because employers have to pay them more to keep them in higher-cost cities.