America

Chinese in America

CHINESE IN AMERICAN HIGH SCHOOLS: Families pay $40,000 to an education consultancy to get their children enrolled in a public high school in Michigan. The ultimate goal is for them to attend a top American university. (NYTIMES)

  • Roughly 370,000 students from the mainland are enrolled in American high schools and universities, 6x more than a decade ago. Their financial impact — $11.4 billion was contributed to the American economy in 2015. It has turned education into one of America’s top “exports” to China.
  • 83% of China’s millionaires are planning to send their children to school abroad. The average age, according to the poll, has dropped to 16 today from 18 in 2014 — the first time it has reached the high-school level.
  • In 2005, only 641 Chinese students were enrolled in American high schools. By 2014, that student population approached 40,000 — a 60-fold increase in a single decade — and it now accounts for nearly half of all international high-school students in the United States.

Image result for chinese students in us

CHINESE IN VEGAS: The first direct flight from Beijing to Las Vegas, launched Dec. 2 by Hainan Airlines, is viewed as a major step toward the goal the Las Vegas Convention & Visitors Authority has set to push international visitation to 30% over the next decade. International visitors currently account for 16% of traffic. (NYTIMES)

Curated by CLAI

Maps of USA: Heartland, Mega Cities, & Corporal Punishment

AMERICA’S HEARTLANDDo big cities belong in the heartland? (If not, choose a map with “holes” in it.) Does the heartland rigidly follow state lines? Does it venture south into Texas, or east into Pennsylvania? (NYTIMES)

MEGA REGIONSMesmerizing commute maps reveal we all live in mega regions and not cities. (Wired)

CORPORAL PUNISHMENT STATES 22 states still allow corporal punishment in school: 15 expressly permit it while another 7 do not prohibit it. Corporal punishment is “the intentional infliction of pain or discomfort and/or the use of physical force upon a student with the intention of causing the student to experience bodily pain so as to correct or punish the student’s behavior.” In the 2013-2014 school year, more than 110,000 students were physically punished. (NPR)

us-states-with-corporal-punishment-in-schools

Curated by CLAI

World’s Favorite Beers + Luxury Toilet Paper

Curated by CLAI

FAVORITE BEERS AROUND THE WORLD: Americans love Bud Light. in Canada, the beer of choice is Bud Light’s heavier cousin Budweiser. Down in Mexico, people choose Corona most often. In China, beer drinkers down a lager beer called Snow; in India, people like a pale lager called Kingfisher best; in Brazil, the most popular brew is a Pilsner called Skol; and across the ocean, in Australia, it’s a beer called Victoria Bitter.

How to drink beer like a local

How to drink beer like a local (WAPO)

LUXURY TOILET PAPER: Americans have a new favorite way to flush money down the drain: luxury toilet paper. Sales in the United States of what the industry calls “luxury” rolls — anything quilted, lotioned, perfumed or ultra-soft, from two- to four-ply — climbed to $1.4 billion last year, outpacing all other kinds of toilet paper for the first time in nearly a decade.

A roll of luxury toilet paper is stamped with gold in Germany. American luxury toilet paper is softer, thicker and gold-free.

A roll of luxury toilet paper is stamped with gold in Germany. American luxury toilet paper is softer, thicker and gold-free. (Michael Dalder, Reuters)

 

 

Don’t Want to Be Manager? Don’t Want to Be an Entrepreneur? You’re Not Alone.

Curated by CLAI

“If you don’t build your dream, someone will hire you to help build theirs.” – Tony Gaskin

ENTREPRENEURSHIP: “Entrepreneurs are willing to work 80 hours a week to avoid working 40 hours a week.”

  • “It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.” ~ Ernest Hemingway
  • “If you don’t build your dream, someone will hire you to help build theirs.” Tony Gaskin

MOST PEOPLE DON’T WANT TO BE MANAGERS: Most American workers aren’t interested in becoming managers.

  • Of the thousands surveyed, only 1/3 of workers (34%) said they aspire to leadership positions – and just 7% strive for C-level management (the rest said they aspire to middle-management or department-head roles).
  • Broken down further, the results show that more men (40%) hope to have a leadership role than women (29%), and that African Americans (39%) and LGBT workers (44%) are more likely to want to climb the corporate ladder than the national average.
  • The results don’t necessarily reflect a lack of ambition. Today’s workers don’t have to be a manager to be successful – they don’t even need to take up a traditional “career.” Which is a good thing, since for many people the corporate ladder doesn’t even exist anymore, as organizations have become flatter and options for moving up more limited.
Who wants to be promoted into leadership? (CareerBuilder & HBR)

Who wants to be promoted into leadership? (CareerBuilder & HBR)

Why U.S. workers aren't aspiring to leadership positions (CareerBuilder & HBR)

Why U.S. workers aren’t aspiring to leadership positions (CareerBuilder & HBR)

 

Day of an American: Sleeping, Commuting, and Working

Curated by CLAI

MAPS OF DAY-TO-DAY AMERICA: Alabama and Mississippi are the nation’s sleep capitals, averaging 9+ hours each. New York and New Jersey spend the most time commuting.

  • North Dakota employees work the longest days. The average employed North Dakotan reports spending 8 hours and 16 minutes at work each day. This is probably related to that state’s Bakken Shale boom and the influx of petroleum industry jobs, where armies of mostly male workers spend long hours on the job site.
  • Maine’s low reported working time — 6 hours and 54 minutes — may be related to a preponderance of seasonal and temporary jobs in the tourism industry in that state. They don’t call it “Vacationland” for nothing.

 

Map of Sleeping America

Alabama and Mississippi are the nation’s sleep capitals, averaging 9+ hours each (WAPO)

AMERICANS WORK 7 DAYS A WEEK: On Tuesdays we work the hardest, and have the hardest time falling asleep. We really don’t like running errands on Wednesday. We devote our weekends to our friends and our pets. We watch a ton of TV every day, but especially on Sunday. The 10 charts below reveal these trends and more.

Chart of how Americans spend their time each day

Everybody really is working for the weekend. (WAPO)