New York Donut & Not So Whole Milk

Curated by CLAI

NEW YORK DONUT: Every corner of New York has its doughnut now. There is room for all of us, the minimalist and the profligate, the nostalgist and the radical.

  • The donut is prehistoric — fossilized ring-shaped cakes have been unearthed, dating back 8,000 years. Free doughnuts were handed to the huddled arrivals at Ellis Island, to lines of hollow-cheeked men during the Great Depression and to soldiers on the battlefields of the First World War, by Salvation Army volunteers who requisitioned helmets as deep fryers and punched holes with spent artillery shells.
  • In New York City, the doughnut no longer resembles the Dutch olykoek that Anna Joralemon started selling in 1673 from a shop on lower Broadway. Along with a hole, it has acquired glazes in Barbie hues, fillings that wheeze forth on first bite, even do-it-yourself accessories like a syringe primed with jam, waiting to be stabbed in.
Mah-Ze-Dahr Bakery’s doughnuts made in Chelsea. (Tony Cenicola/The New York Times)

Mah-Ze-Dahr Bakery’s doughnuts made in Chelsea. (Tony Cenicola/The New York Times)

WHOLE MILK NOT THAT WHOLE: Whole milk isn’t made wholly of fat, or largely of fat, or even substantially of fat. In fact, it doesn’t contain much fat all. Whole milk is actually only about 3.5% fat.

The reason it’s called “whole milk” has less to do with its fat content, than the fact that it’s comparatively unadulterated. As the Dairy Council of California puts it, whole milk is “the way it comes from the cow before processing.”

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