Climbing the Career Ladder? (And School Dress Codes)

Curated by CLAI

CAREER LADDER: Careers, like life, do not move in a straight line. I’ve accepted that there is not only one answer, and that the “perfect job” may not exist for me. Rather than a ladder, I see my career as a pond of lily pads extending in all directions. There is no one way “up,” just a series of opportunities and mini-experiments that get you closer and closer to discovering what’s meaningful.

  • Where do you get on the ladder? Is there one in each city in the world? What happens if you want to try two different ladders at the same time? If you hop off for a detour, do you have to start back from the bottom, or do you get to return to the rung where you left off?
  • Only 27% of college graduates have a job related to their college major, and more than 90% of millennials expect to stay in a job for less than three years.
  • Yet 20-somethings are still erringly being told to figure out their (single) calling, find the perfect first job in that field, and then maintain a linear career trajectory.
  • 90% of college students are optimistic about their ability to find a good job when they graduate.
  • 70% said it was important find a job that allows them to do what they love, while only 20% said it was important to find a job that pays well.
Career Ladder

Career Ladder (BEWFAA)

SCHOOL DRESS CODE: If you’re wondering whether dress code policies disproportionately govern what female students can — or can’t — wear to school, you’re right. Our informal survey showed that regulations are more restrictive for women than for men.

  • Almost half the public schools in the country now have a dress code. That number has increased from 21% in 2000.
  • Shorts/Skirt Length: Most schools we surveyed have some rules on how long skirts and shorts must be, and how short is too short. Some go with the “fingertip rule” (shorts and skirts must extend beyond the fingertips), while others require only an “appropriate length.”
  • Bare Shoulders/Midriffs: Navel-baring blouses are a no-go at nearly every school we surveyed. Most also put some regulation on shirt sleeves. Spaghetti-strap tank tops are a common target. So are halter tops — but some schools ban sleeveless shirts all together.
  • Illegal/Profane/Suggestive Content: Clothing that suggests or portrays violence, illegal acts or illegal substances are almost an unequivocal no. Mostly, we’re talking T-shirts here.
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