Who’s More Famous than Jesus + What Would Plato Tweet?

Curated by CLAI

NETWORK OF FAME: Who’s more famous than Jesus Christ? There are many varieties of fame. Jesus Christ was the first person to achieve it globally. Pantheon, a new project from the Macro Connections group in M.I.T.’s Media Lab, is giving that a stab. It has collected and analyzed data on cultural production from 4,000 B.C. to 2010.

Most Famous People of the Last 6,000 Years

  1. Aristotle
  2. Plato
  3. Jesus Christ
  4. Socrates
  5. Alexander the Great
  6. Leonardo Da Vinci
  7. Confucius
  8. Julius Caesar
  9. Homer
  10. Pythagoras
Fame Network

A network of fame according to Pantheon, a new project from M.I.T.’s Media Lab.

WHAT WOULD PLATO TWEET: Your Klout score (calculated per your online influence through social media) is markedly similar to what the Greeks had called kleos. The word comes from the old Homeric word for “I hear,” and it meant a kind of auditory renown. Vulgarly speaking, it was fame.

  • What they wanted was the attention of other mortals. All that we can do to enlarge our lives, they concluded, is to strive to make of them things worth the telling, the stuff of stories that will make an impact on other mortal minds, so that, being replicated there, our lives will take on moreness. The more outstanding you were, the more mental replication of you there would be, and the more replication, the more you mattered.
  • How satisfying, in the end, is a culture of social-media obsession? The multireplication so readily available is as short-lived and insubstantial as the many instances of our lives they replicate. If the inadequacies of kleos were what initially precipitated the emergence of philosophy, then maybe it’s time for philosophy to take on Klout.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s