Money

Money & Bras: From Corsets to Brassieres, States with the Biggest Bang for Your Buck

Curated by CLAI

THE BRA: Women today breathe a little easier — thanks to a World War I metal shortage. Since corset frames were mostly made of metal, which was needed for ammunition and other military supplies, in 1917 the U.S. War Industries Board asked American women to stop buying them.

  • Caresse Crosby patented the first modern bra in the U.S. in 1910.
  • Some historians credit William and Ida Rosenthal, founders of Maidenform, with introducing the A-, B-, C- and D-cup system in the late 1920s or early ’30s, while others claim it was S.H. Camp and Company.
  • When the androgynous flapper look came into vogue in the Roaring Twenties, so-called bandeau bras — which flattened the breasts — became the popular choice.
  • Today, nearly 95% of women in Western countries wear bras, which translates to a billion-dollar industry dominated by Victoria’s Secret and corporations like Hanes.
Brassiere in 1914

Brassiere in 1914

STATES WITH BEST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK: You’d squeeze the most out of $100 in Mississippi, where you could use it to buy $115.74 worth of goods and services, relative to the national average. Arkansas comes next, followed by Missouri, Alabama and South Dakota. The state where $100 falls flattest is Hawaii, where that same $100 gets you only $85.32. (D.C., though not a state, is even worse: It would buy you just $84.60 in goods.)

Relative Value of $100 in States in the U.S. (WAPO)

 

 

Generational Differences in Savings and Politics

Curated by CLAI

MILLENNIAL SAVE MORE: Millennials are more likely to have at least five months of living expenses saved. They tend to have lower expenses. They don’t have to put away as much because they are likely living at home with their parents or have roommates.

30 and 49 are more likely than any other age group to not have an emergency fund because those are the years they have a house, two or three kids and a dog. But they need the emergency savings more than anybody.”

Politics by Age

Politics by Age (NYTIMES)

POLITICS BY BIRTH YEAR: Events at age 18 are about three times as powerful as those at age 40, according to the model.

  • Silent Generation (1941): By the time Eisenhower left office in 1961, people born in the early 1940s had accumulated pro-Republican sentiment that would last their entire lifetimes.
  • Baby Boomers (1952): Childhoods and formative years under Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon left them relatively pro-Democratic.

$130K American Dream & Secret of Success

Curated by CLAI

$130K AMERICAN DREAM PRICE TAG: What it costs to live the American Dream (pre-tax).

 

American Dream Price Tag Chart

American Dream Price Tag (USA Today)

SECRET OF MOTIVATION & SUCCESS: Those with strong internal motives (become a leader) and strong instrumental motives (get a good job later in life) are the least successful. Most successful are those with only strong internal motives, followed by those with only strong instrumental motives.

To Rent or to Buy? This Wine or That?

Curated by CLAI

TO RENT OR BUY?

Is it Better to Rent or Buy?

Is it Better to Rent or Buy? (NYTimes)

TOP 20 SUMMER WINES UNDER 20

  • Ameztoi Getariako Txakolina 2013: Txakolina is the national drink of Spanish Basque country, where a vast amount is consumed every summer. This particular version is from the Getaria region, where the Txakolina tends to be slightly fizzy and low in alcohol, encouraging plenty of thirst-quenching chugging. The Ameztoi is fresh and slightly briny, with flavors of lemon and lime. It calls out for sardines, anchovies and all manner of seafood.
  • La Rioja Alta Rioja Viña Alberdi Reserva 2007: Viña Alberdi is a great value in Rioja from an old-school producer that still ages the wine before releasing it. It’s well shaped and structured with classic Rioja flavors of spicy red fruit framed by the mellow vanilla of American oak. I’m not usually a fan of oaky wine, but in traditionally made Riojas, softened by a few years of age, the flavors just fit.
  • C. von Schubert Maximin Grünhäuser Mosel Riesling Feinherb 2012: Between dry German rieslings and the exquisitely balanced but sweet kabinetts and spätleses lies the nether world of “feinherb,” which in the German scheme of things means not “medium sweet” but “medium dry.” Whatever. This is predominantly dry with a hint of sweetness, a vivacious expression of Mosel riesling that is a mere 11 percent alcohol.
Summer Wines

Summer Wines (Tony Cenicola, NYTimes)

Happier at Work or At Home?

Curated by CLAI

LESS STRESSED AT WORK THAN HOME? Both men and women are significantly less stressed out at work than they are at home. Women said they were happier at work. While the men said they felt happier at home.

  • Those with high incomes, she said, were the only outlier: Both men and women had much higher levels of cortisol at work, and both felt happier at home.
  • What does this tell you? It’s not so much that people prefer to be at work rather than at home or with kids. It’s that trying to do both in the same day is stressful. It’s the juggling that’s killing us.
Workplace

Workplace (Olivier Schrauwen, NYTimes)

WHY YOU HATE WORK: The way we’re working isn’t working. Even if you’re lucky enough to have a job, you’re probably not very excited to get to the office in the morning, you don’t feel much appreciated while you’re there, you find it difficult to get your most important work accomplished, amid all the distractions, and you don’t believe that what you’re doing makes much of a difference anyway. By the time you get home, you’re pretty much running on empty, and yet still answering emails until you fall asleep.