Food and Drink

Hear Hot v. Cold Water? Wanna Share the Leftovers?

Curated by CLAI

HEARING HOT V. COLD: Can you hear the difference between hot and cold water? Most people can.

  • Cold water is more viscous than hot water, because the molecules are wiggling less rapidly, so they are effectively stickier. How viscous a liquid is affects how it pours, and therefore how it sounds.
  • Bubbliness is also a factor. There tends to be more bubbling in a liquid that’s hot. As you have more bubbling, you tend to get higher frequency sounds from it.
Hearing Temperature Differences

Hearing Temperature Differences (NPR)

LEFTOVERS? You can share it. With an app.

  • HUNGARY: Picniq  allows users share what they are cooking and eating — and for users to share in those meals.
  • GREECE: Cookisto began as a way to connect home cooks with busy people looking for a hot meal.
  • GERMANY: Foodsharing.de allows its 43,000 users to share surplus food in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.
  • ITALY: Ratatouille allows users to post their extra food in their “fridge” in the app for others to claim and arrange drop-off points.

Best American Burgers and Universities

Curated by CLAI

BEST FAST BURGER: The Habit Burger Grill, In-N-Out, and Five Guys top the list with 8.1, 80. McDonald’s scores a paltry 5.8.

Best American Fast Burger Chart

Best American Fast Burger (Consumer Reports)

AMERICAN BEST UNIVERSITIES IN THE WORLD? 18 of the world’s top 25 universities are American. “We have the best universities” does not mean “our universities are, on average, the best” — even though that’s what many people hear. It means, “Of the best universities, most are ours.”

  • Only 18% of American adults with bachelor’s degrees score at the top two levels of numeracy, compared with the international average of 24%.
  • Americans with associate’s and graduate degrees also lag behind their international peers.

6 Iced Coffees, Domino’s Smart Slice, and Canned Craft Beer

Curated by CLAI

6 ICED COFFEES: Inventive, refreshing and delicious in Washington, DC and Brooklyn, NY

  • Kenya Cola, Mockingbird Hill in Washington, D.C.: Kenyan coffee with a little sugar is chilled in an ice bath, mixed with three kinds of bitters (tiki, Spanish and black walnut), then poured in a glass with ice and topped with soda water.
  • Thunderbolt, Smith Canteen in Brooklyn: First came the freshly made lemonade, a taste of the Arkansas childhood of Rob Newton, the chef and an owner. Then came a shot of Haru, a citric coffee with gingery flavors that is grown in Ethiopia and roasted by Counter Culture Coffee. The two partner beautifully for a captivating flavor that’s part iced Americano, part American South.
Coffee

The Black & Blue from Cuvée Coffee (Phil Kline, NYTimes)

DOMINO’S SMART SLICE: Domino’s is delivering a pizza it calls the Smart Slice to more than 3,000 lunchrooms in 38 states, up from 3 states in 2010.

  • Compared with the standard Domino’s pizza, the Smart Slice has 1/3 less fat in the pepperoni, 1/3 less salt in the sauce, and cheese with just half the usual fat — all changes made to fit the new standards.
  • Domino’s uses a brand called Ultragrain, made by the food giant ConAgra; it makes up 51 percent of the flour in the crusts. Ultragrain is derived from a hard winter wheat called Snowmass, developed in 2009 by food scientists at Colorado State University, and the brand is showing up as an ingredient in an increasing variety of foods aimed at the school market, including Kellogg’s Pop-Tarts and Pepperidge Farm Goldfish.

CANNED CRAFT BEER: More and more fancy craft beer is showing up in aluminum cans. For decades, canned beer was the stuff you bought cheap — the PBR or Natural Ice — bottom-shelf beer. But the number of craft breweries putting their beer in cans has more than doubled since 2012.

  • Can advocates and brewers who are choosing cans say there are clear advantages over bottles: The beer in a can cools faster. The can protects from beer-degrading light. Beer cans are portable and take up less space, advantages both for retailers and for consumers who want to take them camping, hiking or fishing. There’s also more space on a can for wraparound design and decoration.
  • The biggest selling point for the bottle, though, is flavor. There’s at least a perception that cans impart a metallic taste, whereas liquid stored in a bottle comes out tasting pure. However, Most aluminum cans these days are lined with a polymer coating that protects the beer from the metal.

To Rent or to Buy? This Wine or That?

Curated by CLAI

TO RENT OR BUY?

Is it Better to Rent or Buy?

Is it Better to Rent or Buy? (NYTimes)

TOP 20 SUMMER WINES UNDER 20

  • Ameztoi Getariako Txakolina 2013: Txakolina is the national drink of Spanish Basque country, where a vast amount is consumed every summer. This particular version is from the Getaria region, where the Txakolina tends to be slightly fizzy and low in alcohol, encouraging plenty of thirst-quenching chugging. The Ameztoi is fresh and slightly briny, with flavors of lemon and lime. It calls out for sardines, anchovies and all manner of seafood.
  • La Rioja Alta Rioja Viña Alberdi Reserva 2007: Viña Alberdi is a great value in Rioja from an old-school producer that still ages the wine before releasing it. It’s well shaped and structured with classic Rioja flavors of spicy red fruit framed by the mellow vanilla of American oak. I’m not usually a fan of oaky wine, but in traditionally made Riojas, softened by a few years of age, the flavors just fit.
  • C. von Schubert Maximin Grünhäuser Mosel Riesling Feinherb 2012: Between dry German rieslings and the exquisitely balanced but sweet kabinetts and spätleses lies the nether world of “feinherb,” which in the German scheme of things means not “medium sweet” but “medium dry.” Whatever. This is predominantly dry with a hint of sweetness, a vivacious expression of Mosel riesling that is a mere 11 percent alcohol.
Summer Wines

Summer Wines (Tony Cenicola, NYTimes)

Science of Food: Bar Snacks, Trix, and Quaker Oats

Curated by CLAI

FOOD & EYE CONTACT: Making eye contact even with a character on a cereal box inspires powerful feelings of connection. Look inside your kitchen cabinet and odds are you have a collection of old friends gazing back at you — the Quaker Oats man, the Sun-Maid girl, Aunt Jemima and maybe a Keebler elf or two. The reason they are there may have more do with your subconscious craving for eye contact than the taste of the products.

  • In the gaze of the cartoon rabbit on Trix cereal boxes, adult subjects were more likely to choose Trix over competing brands if the rabbit was looking at them rather than away. In a creepy corollary, the eyes of characters on boxes of cereal marketed to kids were directed downward, and can meet the upward gaze of children in grocery store aisles.
  • Only actual eye contact fully activates those parts of the brain that allow us to more acutely and accurately process another person’s feelings and intentions. Think of it as a cognitive jump-start that occurs whenever you lock eyes with another person, whether in front of you or across a crowded room.
  • Even the brains of legally blind people have been shown to light up when someone looks them in the eye. It’s a sort of primal awareness and why you sometimes feel someone is looking at you before you turn and see them.
Bar snack

Enough with stale peanuts and soggy pretzels. The American bar snack has become a thing of refinement. Here, giant curls of potato chips served with a smoked-onion rémoulade ($5) at the chef Marc Forgione’s namesake restaurant in TriBeCa. “It looks like a python of potato,” Mr. Forgione said. “What’s better than chips and dip when you’re at a bar?” (Nancy Borowick, NYTimes)

RISE OF BAR FOOD: The elevation of the American cocktail has led to a corresponding gift to booze hounds everywhere: the refinement of the American bar snack. Influenced by the izakayas of Japan, the tapas counters of Spain, the gastro pubs of England and mixology trailblazers like PDT in the East Village, bar owners and restaurateurs have brought a new level of care, craft and passion to something that used to be a negligible form of human nourishment.