Fashion

Selfie Makovers and Facebook Backburners

Curated by CLAI

SELFIE MAKEOVER APP: If you haven’t been hitting the gym lately, Photox can add six-pack abs ($3.96), give you skinny legs ($3.96) or bulk-up your arms ($2.97). If it’s a dermatologist you desire, the app can also minimize wrinkles ($2.97), lighten skin ($3.96) and remove acne (99 cents). Photox is connects people with a team of experienced photo editors who can alter images as quickly and naturally as possible.

Developed by a No. Virginia professional, Photox allows users to submit photos for an editing makeover. (Courtesy of Photox)

DIGITAL INFIDELITY: Facebook users in relationships frequently use the site to keep in touch with “back-burners” — exes or platonic friends they know they could connect with romantically, should their current relationships go south.

  • Men have back-burners at roughly twice the rate of women.
  • On average, respondents in relationships said they had romantic or sexual conversations with two people (!) besides their current partner.

Women Power Suits and A Good Job for the Hubby

Curated by CLAI

POWER SUIT: Want to project power? Your clothes have to fit you. To be a power dresser, it has to look like you command the clothes, not that the clothes are commanding or wearing you.

  • The 1980s was the reign of the floppy bow tie and the suit. And that was the look most women wore in their 20s and 30s when they started in the workplace.
  • By the ’90s, women began to hang up their broad-shouldered jackets to favor the softer, more luxurious fabrics used by designers like Donna Karan.
A publicity still from the movie Working Girl, which prominently featured the beloved power suit.

The movie Working Girl, which prominently featured the beloved power suit. (NPR)

GOOD JOB MOST IMPORTANT IN A HUSBAND: What ever-married women want in a spouse, more than anything else, is someone with a good job. 78% of women said steady employment was important to them in a partner, more than the 70% who wanted someone with similar ideas about raising children, or the 38% who cared about sharing moral or religious views.

There are no gender differences between the spousal personality traits that helped a woman’s career and the ones that helped a man’s. In both cases, having a conscientious partner is the only trait that had any measurable correlation. What allows someone to lean in is a conscientious partner. It’s something both sexes should think about in their careers.

History of Eggs and Jeans

Curated by CLAI

BLUE JEANS: The nation’s devotion to denim is wearing thin. Sales fell a significant 6% over the last year after decades of steady growth since Marlon Brando’s 1950s.

  • Sales of yoga pants and other active wear climbed 7% in the same period. Everyone wants to look like they’re running to the gym, even if they’re not.
  • Blue jeans’ fade could also be due to a lack of new styles since brightly colored skinnies hit the market several years ago.
Levi's didn't even call them "jeans" until after James Dean wore them. Would he have preferred stretch fabrics and elastic waistbands?

James Dean in Jeans (AP)

WASH EGGS: About a 100 years ago, many people around the world washed their eggs. But there are a lot of ways to do it wrong, so the method got a bad reputation in certain parts of the world.

  • By 1970, the U.S. Department of Agriculture had perfected the art of the wash with the help of fancy machines, and it required all egg producers to do it to prevent salmonella.
  • Meanwhile, many European countries were prohibiting washing, as egg-laying hens are vaccinated against salmonella.
  • Asian countries never got on board with it. The exception was Japan, which joined the egg-washers after a bad spate of salmonella in the 1990s.
To refrigerate or not to refrigerate? It boils down to bacteria, aesthetics and how much energy you're willing to use.

Refrigerated v. room temperature eggs (Robert S. Donovan; Flickr / Alex Barth; Flickr)

Climbing the Career Ladder? (And School Dress Codes)

Curated by CLAI

CAREER LADDER: Careers, like life, do not move in a straight line. I’ve accepted that there is not only one answer, and that the “perfect job” may not exist for me. Rather than a ladder, I see my career as a pond of lily pads extending in all directions. There is no one way “up,” just a series of opportunities and mini-experiments that get you closer and closer to discovering what’s meaningful.

  • Where do you get on the ladder? Is there one in each city in the world? What happens if you want to try two different ladders at the same time? If you hop off for a detour, do you have to start back from the bottom, or do you get to return to the rung where you left off?
  • Only 27% of college graduates have a job related to their college major, and more than 90% of millennials expect to stay in a job for less than three years.
  • Yet 20-somethings are still erringly being told to figure out their (single) calling, find the perfect first job in that field, and then maintain a linear career trajectory.
  • 90% of college students are optimistic about their ability to find a good job when they graduate.
  • 70% said it was important find a job that allows them to do what they love, while only 20% said it was important to find a job that pays well.
Career Ladder

Career Ladder (BEWFAA)

SCHOOL DRESS CODE: If you’re wondering whether dress code policies disproportionately govern what female students can — or can’t — wear to school, you’re right. Our informal survey showed that regulations are more restrictive for women than for men.

  • Almost half the public schools in the country now have a dress code. That number has increased from 21% in 2000.
  • Shorts/Skirt Length: Most schools we surveyed have some rules on how long skirts and shorts must be, and how short is too short. Some go with the “fingertip rule” (shorts and skirts must extend beyond the fingertips), while others require only an “appropriate length.”
  • Bare Shoulders/Midriffs: Navel-baring blouses are a no-go at nearly every school we surveyed. Most also put some regulation on shirt sleeves. Spaghetti-strap tank tops are a common target. So are halter tops — but some schools ban sleeveless shirts all together.
  • Illegal/Profane/Suggestive Content: Clothing that suggests or portrays violence, illegal acts or illegal substances are almost an unequivocal no. Mostly, we’re talking T-shirts here.

Fairytale Weddings & Fruits in Vogue

Curated by CLAI

Fairytale Romance and Wedding? At Paris Wedding Center, a company with three locations in the Chinatowns of Manhattan and Flushing, Queens, the lines between reality and fairy tale are blurred. Not only are photos and videos often taken months before the ceremony, they also don’t necessarily document actual events.

Instead, couples visit studios crammed with costumes and props, sets and backdrops — some traditionally Western, others straight out of Chinese folklore — and act out romantic fantasies in what has become a trend for Chinese newlyweds in New York, just as it is in China.

Upcoming Fruit in Fashion

Glass Gem Corn

Glass Gem Corn (NPR)