Culture

Stressed Out?

Curated by CLAI

STRESSED OUT: Women are more stressed out than men in every category – too many responsibilities, finances, work, health, neighbors – except for friends.

  • 18-29 year olds are most stressed out by “too many responsibilities.” 30-39 year-olds most stressed about finances. 65+ year-olds are least stressed out by their looks.
  • 70% of people respond to extreme stress by sleeping less than usual.
  • 83% of 18-29 year olds say stress has a positive effect in their lives – the highest in all age groups.
Sources of Stress by Age Group

Sources of Stress by Age Group (NPR)

PARENTING AROUND THE WORLD: Dutch parents believe strongly in not pushing their children too hard. “People would talk about a cousin who got a PhD and was very unhappy because there were no jobs at universities, and said that you shouldn’t teach your child to read before they got to school, because then your child would be bored at school and not have any friends.”

 

Modern Man and College Gentrification

Curated by CLAI

MODERN MAN: Because men take longer to finish college and marry later than women, they are more likely to stick around their parents’ house. In 2012, 40% of millennial men (ages 18-31) lived at home. American men earn about 19% more than women.

Adults Age 25-34 Living At Home (1983-2013)

Adults Age 25-34 Living At Home 1983-2013 (Alyson Hurt/NPR)

COLLEGE GRAD GENTRIFICATION: The more college grads, the more expensive the city, the more gentrification – less crime, better school, better restaurants, bars, museums, and art galleries. College graduates also live in the nicest cities in the country. They’re getting more benefits, even net of fact that they’re paying higher housing costs.

  • In 1980, a college graduate earned about 38% more than a worker with only a high-school diploma. By 2000, 57%. By 2011, 73%.
  • Nationwide education gentrification is at the scale of entire cities. Picture low-skilled workers increasingly excluded from Washington and San Francisco and segregated into cities like Toledo or Baton Rouge.
  • In the past, higher-wage cities attracted more workers, driving up the supply of labor and driving down the high wages that drew them to those cities in the first place, counteracting some of the inequality we see today.
  • A higher share of college graduates also yielded higher wages for workers without college degrees, likely because employers have to pay them more to keep them in higher-cost cities.

 

Generational Differences in Savings and Politics

Curated by CLAI

MILLENNIAL SAVE MORE: Millennials are more likely to have at least five months of living expenses saved. They tend to have lower expenses. They don’t have to put away as much because they are likely living at home with their parents or have roommates.

30 and 49 are more likely than any other age group to not have an emergency fund because those are the years they have a house, two or three kids and a dog. But they need the emergency savings more than anybody.”

Politics by Age

Politics by Age (NYTIMES)

POLITICS BY BIRTH YEAR: Events at age 18 are about three times as powerful as those at age 40, according to the model.

  • Silent Generation (1941): By the time Eisenhower left office in 1961, people born in the early 1940s had accumulated pro-Republican sentiment that would last their entire lifetimes.
  • Baby Boomers (1952): Childhoods and formative years under Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon left them relatively pro-Democratic.

Languages of the Past and Future

Curated by CLAI

SPEAKING IN A DEAD DIALECT: Growing up, I could feel the language of my parents wither and die like autumn leaves. They had immigrated to the United States from Calabria in the late 1950s and continued to speak the dialect of their poor southern Italian region, but it was a tongue frozen in time by exile and filled with words that no longer existed in their homeland.

  • He had only Calabrian words for the plants, procedures and tools. Each of his children had attained some form of higher education and, with it, freedom from the strife and poverty that had chased him from Italy. We now found his background primitive and remote.
  • I had so much to tell him but no way to say it, a reflection of our relationship during his lifetime. Without his words, I was losing a way to describe the world. Memories suddenly mattered more than ever before, and I didn’t know if I could find the language to keep them alive. Perhaps this Calabrian I now speak with my father is the truly dead dialect, the language that neither changes nor translates.
Social Media Dating

Social Media Dating (Lou Beach)

SOCIAL MEDIA DATING: 15% had used social media to ask someone out on a date. “Getting to know someone through social media could be much more appealing than using traditional dating sites because it was possible to get a more realistic impression of a person. While profiles on dating sites are often carefully contrived, people tend to let more of their individuality and personalities come through casual interactions on Twitter and Instagram.”

Pseudomaturity: Sex, Delinquency, Anxiety

Curated by CLAI

3 SIGNS OF PSEUDOMATURITY: These young teenagers sought out friends who were physically attractive; their romances were more numerous, emotionally intense and sexually exploring than those of their peers; and they dabbled in minor delinquency — skipping school, sneaking into movies, vandalism. The fast-track kids didn’t turn out O.K.

  • At 13, they were viewed by classmates with envy, admiration and not a little awe. The girls wore makeup, had boyfriends and went to parties held by older students. The boys boasted about sneaking beers on a Saturday night and swiping condoms from the local convenience store. They were cool. They were good-looking. They were so not you. Whatever happened to them?
  • Now in their early 20s, many of them have had difficulties with intimate relationships, alcohol and marijuana, and even criminal activity.
  • They are doing more extreme things to try to act cool, bragging about drinking three six-packs on a Saturday night, and their peers are thinking, ‘These kids are not socially competent.’
Cool Kid

Cool Kid (Gianluca Fabrizio/Getty Images)

ANXIETY: Adolescents, on average, experience more anxiety and fear and have a harder time learning how not to be afraid than either children or adults. It turns out that the brain circuit for processing fear — the amygdala — is precocious and develops way ahead of the prefrontal cortex, the seat of reasoning and executive control. This means that adolescents have a brain that is wired with an enhanced capacity for fear and anxiety, but is relatively underdeveloped when it comes to calm reasoning.