Career

Overworked? Take a Lunch Walk, Stop Drinking (Coffee) Alcohol

Curated by CLAI

TIP OF THE DAY: Take a lunchtime walk to buoy your spirits and keep you energy levels up.

WORK LONG HOURS? DRINK TOO MUCH? Those working between 49 and 54 hours a week had the biggest risk of starting to overindulge.

  • Alcohol could be used to relieve stress, that Type A workers could end up in jobs with longer hours, or that there could be an associated link between demanding jobs, alcohol use and people with existing depression or sleep problems.
  • CEOs who end the day with a few glasses of pricey scotch and minimum-wage workers who throw back a few beers after their second shift are both more likely to over-drink than those who work fewer hours.
Why So Jittery? (Nutritionaction.com; Center for Science in the Public Interest)

Why So Jittery? (Nutritionaction.com; Center for Science in the Public Interest)

WHY SO JITTERY? One 20 oz Starbucks coffee = 2 shots of 5-hour energy = 25 Monster drinks = 12 cans of Coca-Cola = 21 Hershey’s Special Dark chocolate

It’s the things that scare you the most that you have to do

Curated by CLAI

Income Ladder Depending on Where You Live: Climbing the income ladder occurs less often in the Southeast and industrial Midwest with the odds notably low in Atlanta, Charlotte, Memphis, Raleigh, Indianapolis, Cincinnati and Columbus. Some of the highest rates occur in the Northeast, Great Plains and West, including in New York, Boston, Salt Lake City, Pittsburgh, Seattle and large swaths of California and Minnesota.

Chances of Ending Up in the Top Fifth, For a Child (NYTIMES)

Chances of Ending Up in the Top Fifth, For a Child (NYTIMES)

Remarkable People on their Careers: “It’s the things that scare you the most that you have to do.” – Ruth Reichl

Why a 40-hour Work Week? Are You Blue AND White Collar?

Curated by CLAI

FORTY-HOUR WORK WEEK: Western economies, particularly that of the United States, have been built in a very calculated manner on gratification, addiction, and unnecessary spending. We spend to cheer ourselves up, to reward ourselves, to celebrate, to fix problems, to elevate our status, and to alleviate boredom.

  • Can you imagine what would happen if all of America stopped buying so much unnecessary fluff that doesn’t add a lot of lasting value to our lives?
  • The economy would collapse and never recover.

Read More: Your Lifestyle Has Already Been Designed (True Activist)

David Cain (Raptitude)

Forty-hour work week. (David Cain, (Raptitude)

WHITE V. BLUE COLLAR: My perhaps naïve hope is that when I tell students I’m not only an academic, but a “survival” jobholder, I’ll make a dent in the artificial, inaccurate division society places between blue-collar work and “intelligent” work. We expect our teachers to teach us, not our servers, although in the current economy, these might be the same people.

Read More: Your Waitress is Your Professor (NYTIMES)

Professor or Waitress? (Roman Muradov, NYTIMES)

Professor or Waitress? (Roman Muradov, NYTIMES)

Work Hard, Get Rich? Fewer Men Working

Curated by CLAI

WORK HARD, GET RICH? The number of people who believe you can start off poor and get rich has steadily declined.

  • In 2005, 80% said it was possible.
  • By 2011 it was at 75% and dropped to 71% in July 2012.
  • In 2014, almost 48% of all Americans said they expected life for “future generations” to be “worse than life today,” while 22% said it would be better. Another 27% said life would be about the same.

Read more: Work hard, get rich? Maybe not anymore (Washington Post)

Vanishing male worker

Vanishing male worker (NYTIMES)

VANISHING MALE WORKER: Working, in America, is in decline. The share of prime-age men — those 25 to 54 years old — who are not working has more than tripled since the late 1960s, to 16%.

  • Deep changes in American society have made it easier for them to live without working: the availability of federal disability benefits; the decline of marriage, which means fewer men provide for children; and the rise of the Internet, which has reduced the isolation of unemployment.
  • It has become harder for men to find higher-paying jobs. Foreign competition and technological advances have eliminated many of the jobs in which high school graduates once could earn $40 an hour, or more.
  • The poll found that 85% of prime-age men without jobs do not have bachelor’s degrees. And 34% said they had criminal records, making it hard to find any work.

Read more: The Vanishing Male Worker: How America Fell Behind (New York Times)

Are You a Trailing Spouse? Flexible High Performer?

Curated by CLAI

TRAILING SPOUSE: The tendency for men to move more often than women is completely explained by the types of jobs they enter, not that they are men or women. Is occupational segregation self-fulfilling? If you look at women who are not married, they relocate for a job less often than men do.

  • Men who enter female-dominated jobs don’t tend to move as much for work. If you look at women who enter male-dominated jobs, they tend to move a lot.
  • If everyone generally assumes families will put the husband’s career first, then maybe this compels women to choose certain types of jobs, which is disturbing.
  • Women who choose to enter into the geographically-clustered jobs dominated by men have a higher divorce rate than women in dispersed jobs.

HIGH PERFORMERS: Employees value competitive compensation and bonuses, followed by retirement, training, flexible location, and vacation time. 42% of high performers are willing to move to a different state or region, 37% to a different country, 28% to a different continent.

Left untended, your high performers will seek alternative opportunities that provide more challenges, growth, and rewards. Your competitors would love to have them. Keep your best workers by meeting their wants and needs.

Likelihood of high performers to leave their current companies (HBR)

Likelihood of high performers to leave their current companies (HBR)

Likelihood for high performance to relocate for a better job (HBR)

Likelihood for high performance to relocate for a better job (HBR)