Career

Top 15 Success Tips & Conference Call Secrets

Curated by CLAI

9 THINGS SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE WON’T DO: They won’t say yes unless they really want to. The more difficulty that you have saying no, the more likely you are to experience stress, burnout, and even depression. Saying no is indeed a major challenge for most people. “No” is a powerful word that you should not be afraid to wield. When it’s time to say no, emotionally intelligent people avoid phrases like “I don’t think I can” or “I’m not certain.” Saying no to a new commitment honors your existing commitments and gives you the opportunity to successfully fulfill them.

Conference Call Activities Chart

What people do when they’re on a conference call (HBR)

TOP 6 THINGS YOU DO ON A CONFERENCE CALL: Most people are not 100% on the conference call. Instead they are: doing other work (67%), emailing (63%), eating or making food (55%), or at the restroom (47%).

 

Do You Pre-crastinate? Millennials are Generation Nice?

Curated by CLAI

PRE-CRASTINATION: When it comes to structuring our work, many of us pre-crastinate – How often have you rushed to complete a task ahead of time? we’re constantly trying to check off tasks to free up our working memory—the information we remember in the short-term. Instead of being eager to get things done quickly, perhaps we need to focus on getting things done more slowly but with better quality and less revisions down the road.

Generation Nice

Generation Nice (Bon Duke, NYTIMES)

GENERATION NICE: Millenials are not an entitled generation but a complex and introspective one — with a far higher proportion of nonwhites than its predecessors as well as a greater number of people raised by a single parent.

  • Its members also have weathered many large public traumas: the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, costly (and unresolved) wars, the Great Recession.
  • Add to those the flood of images of Iraq and Katrina (and, for older millennials, Oklahoma City and Columbine) — episodes lived and relived, played and replayed, on TV and computer screens.
  • Almost two-thirds or 64% of millennials said they would rather make $40,000 a year at a job they love than $100,000 a year at a job they think is boring.

Are You Lucky? Ignorance is not Bliss

Curated by CLAI

ARE YOU LUCKY: Unlucky people miss chance opportunities because they are too focused on looking for something else. The harder you look, the less you see. The more anxious you are, the less likely you notice the unexpected. The more tense you are, the less likely you will be able to take advantage of unexpected ‘luck’ – therefore the more unlucky you are.

Lucky people generate good fortune via four basic principles. They are skilled at creating and noticing chance opportunities, make lucky decisions by listening to their intuition, create self-fulfilling prophesies via positive expectations, and adopt a resilient attitude that transforms bad luck into good.

Ignorance Isn't Bliss

Ignorance Isn’t Bliss (Lucinda Schreiber, NPR)

IGNORANCE IS NOT BLISS: Many of us have information aversion or the ostrich effect. In other words, we would rather not know if we have a serious or terminal illness if we have been scared by the consequences. The worse the consequences, the more likely people are to avoid testing. Scaring people more about the implications may scare them away from getting tested.

Climbing the Career Ladder? (And School Dress Codes)

Curated by CLAI

CAREER LADDER: Careers, like life, do not move in a straight line. I’ve accepted that there is not only one answer, and that the “perfect job” may not exist for me. Rather than a ladder, I see my career as a pond of lily pads extending in all directions. There is no one way “up,” just a series of opportunities and mini-experiments that get you closer and closer to discovering what’s meaningful.

  • Where do you get on the ladder? Is there one in each city in the world? What happens if you want to try two different ladders at the same time? If you hop off for a detour, do you have to start back from the bottom, or do you get to return to the rung where you left off?
  • Only 27% of college graduates have a job related to their college major, and more than 90% of millennials expect to stay in a job for less than three years.
  • Yet 20-somethings are still erringly being told to figure out their (single) calling, find the perfect first job in that field, and then maintain a linear career trajectory.
  • 90% of college students are optimistic about their ability to find a good job when they graduate.
  • 70% said it was important find a job that allows them to do what they love, while only 20% said it was important to find a job that pays well.
Career Ladder

Career Ladder (BEWFAA)

SCHOOL DRESS CODE: If you’re wondering whether dress code policies disproportionately govern what female students can — or can’t — wear to school, you’re right. Our informal survey showed that regulations are more restrictive for women than for men.

  • Almost half the public schools in the country now have a dress code. That number has increased from 21% in 2000.
  • Shorts/Skirt Length: Most schools we surveyed have some rules on how long skirts and shorts must be, and how short is too short. Some go with the “fingertip rule” (shorts and skirts must extend beyond the fingertips), while others require only an “appropriate length.”
  • Bare Shoulders/Midriffs: Navel-baring blouses are a no-go at nearly every school we surveyed. Most also put some regulation on shirt sleeves. Spaghetti-strap tank tops are a common target. So are halter tops — but some schools ban sleeveless shirts all together.
  • Illegal/Profane/Suggestive Content: Clothing that suggests or portrays violence, illegal acts or illegal substances are almost an unequivocal no. Mostly, we’re talking T-shirts here.

Happier at Work or At Home?

Curated by CLAI

LESS STRESSED AT WORK THAN HOME? Both men and women are significantly less stressed out at work than they are at home. Women said they were happier at work. While the men said they felt happier at home.

  • Those with high incomes, she said, were the only outlier: Both men and women had much higher levels of cortisol at work, and both felt happier at home.
  • What does this tell you? It’s not so much that people prefer to be at work rather than at home or with kids. It’s that trying to do both in the same day is stressful. It’s the juggling that’s killing us.
Workplace

Workplace (Olivier Schrauwen, NYTimes)

WHY YOU HATE WORK: The way we’re working isn’t working. Even if you’re lucky enough to have a job, you’re probably not very excited to get to the office in the morning, you don’t feel much appreciated while you’re there, you find it difficult to get your most important work accomplished, amid all the distractions, and you don’t believe that what you’re doing makes much of a difference anyway. By the time you get home, you’re pretty much running on empty, and yet still answering emails until you fall asleep.