Career

Docked Pay for Massive Debt? Women Pay Women Less?

Curated by CLAI

MASSIVE DEBT? U.S. Federal law allows up to 25% of your wages garnished or docked often over credit card debt, medical bill, or student loans. Check out how much your state (law) protects your paycheck.

Wage Garnishment


Wage Garnishment (National Consumer Law Center Report: “No Fresh Start”)

WOMEN GAVE LESS TO WOMEN: Both men and women made lower offers, on average, when the responder was female. Male proposers offered an average of $4.73 to male respondents, but only $4.43 to women. More painful yet was the behavior of female proposers, who, on average, offered $5.13 to men but only $4.31 to women. It seems that women were seen as softies who were willing to settle for less — and the discrimination was worse coming from the women themselves.

Don’t Want to Be Manager? Don’t Want to Be an Entrepreneur? You’re Not Alone.

Curated by CLAI

“If you don’t build your dream, someone will hire you to help build theirs.” – Tony Gaskin

ENTREPRENEURSHIP: “Entrepreneurs are willing to work 80 hours a week to avoid working 40 hours a week.”

  • “It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.” ~ Ernest Hemingway
  • “If you don’t build your dream, someone will hire you to help build theirs.” Tony Gaskin

MOST PEOPLE DON’T WANT TO BE MANAGERS: Most American workers aren’t interested in becoming managers.

  • Of the thousands surveyed, only 1/3 of workers (34%) said they aspire to leadership positions – and just 7% strive for C-level management (the rest said they aspire to middle-management or department-head roles).
  • Broken down further, the results show that more men (40%) hope to have a leadership role than women (29%), and that African Americans (39%) and LGBT workers (44%) are more likely to want to climb the corporate ladder than the national average.
  • The results don’t necessarily reflect a lack of ambition. Today’s workers don’t have to be a manager to be successful – they don’t even need to take up a traditional “career.” Which is a good thing, since for many people the corporate ladder doesn’t even exist anymore, as organizations have become flatter and options for moving up more limited.
Who wants to be promoted into leadership? (CareerBuilder & HBR)

Who wants to be promoted into leadership? (CareerBuilder & HBR)

Why U.S. workers aren't aspiring to leadership positions (CareerBuilder & HBR)

Why U.S. workers aren’t aspiring to leadership positions (CareerBuilder & HBR)

 

Portlandia & Norway: Desired by the Poor, Educated, and Criminals?

Curated by CLAI

“Young people are increasingly telling themselves, ‘I’m going to move somewhere and pursue my career,’ rather than, ‘I’m going to pursue my career and go wherever it takes me.’” That line stuck with me as many of my friends and colleagues move to other cities and even countries to live. Many young Americans now have the liberty and flexibility to pick up and move wherever our heart desires because we are not worrying about just food, water, and shelter, but are in search of meaning and passion.

With that, countries like Norway have such high standards of living – their prison cells look better than a lot of dorm rooms and apartments I’ve ever lived in. Our needs are all relative to our surroundings.

Portland, Oregon: Where Work is Optional (Kelsey Dake, NYTIMES)

Portland, Oregon: Where Work is Optional (Kelsey Dake, NYTIMES)

PORTLAND: People move to New York to be in media or finance; they move to L.A. to be in show business. People move to Portland to move to Portland.

  • Portland has taken hold of the cultural imagination as, to borrow the tag line from “Portlandia,” the place where young people go to retire.
  • The city has nearly all the perks that economists suggest lead to a high quality of life — coastlines, mountains, mild winters and summers, restaurants, cultural institutions and clean air.
  • According to the sacrifice measure metric, which essentially charts how poor a person is willing to be in order to live in a particular city: Portland is near the top of the list. Even when college-educated residents get jobs there, they earn 84 cents for the average dollar earned in other cities.
  • We’re not the hungry immigrant nation we used to be. We’re more into meaning, into jobs that find fulfillment. And at least some people are willing to accept lower pay to go somewhere they care about.
  • Portland’s paradox is that it attracts so many of “the young and the restless”, that it has become a city of the overeducated and underemployed — a place where young people are, in many cases, forced into their semiretirement.
Norwegian prison art (Trond Isaksen/ Statsbygg, WAPO)

Norwegian prison art (Trond Isaksen/ Statsbygg, WAPO)

NORWEGIAN PRISONS OR HOTELS? Norway’s prisons are overcrowded, but the Scandinavian country has found a simple solution: sending some of its prisoners abroad. Up to 300 prisoners could be sent to the Netherlands, which has so few criminals that it’s about to close 19 penal facilities.

The reality of Norwegian overcrowding belies the longstanding reputation the country has had for prisons that looked more like modern art museums than penal facilities. Some Norwegian cells look even more luxurious than student dorms.

Colleges with the Highest Salaries – Should I get an MBA?

Curated by CLAI

SCHOOLS WITH HIGHEST SALARIES EARLY & MID CAREER: Technical abilities are highly valued among recent graduates, which explains why a student who graduates from an engineering program at California Institute of Technology will likely be better compensated, at least up front, than a Harvard graduate with an English degree. Those specialized skills offer a comparative salary edge for only a handful of years before that advantage begins to dissipate–and the salary benefits of a holistic, liberal arts education begin to catch up.

Colleges with the highest starting salaries

Colleges with the highest starting salaries (WAPO)

SHOULD YOU GET AN MBA? Here are some questions you should ask yourself.

  • Leadership & Management: Do the MBA programs I’m considering provide practical leadership and management training?
  • Credential & Brand: How are MBAs perceived in the markets I am in or would like to enter? What signals does an MBA send in these markets? What stereotypes (both positive and negative) might I face as an MBA? What is the specific reputation of the MBA programs I’m considering? How are these schools and their alumni viewed within my desired markets?
  • Community & Network: What do I know about the students at the MBA programs I’m considering? Are they like-minded peers? Do I see myself learning alongside them? What do I know about the alumni networks of these programs? How active are they? Are they concentrated in geographic areas and professional fields of interest to me?

The Truth about Travel and Vacations

Curated by CLAI

THE MORE YOU TRAVEL, THE MORE YOU LOSE SIGHT OF WHO YOU ARE

  • Because you realize that the more you spread the breadth of your experience across the globe, the thinner and more meaningless it becomes. You realize that there’s something to be said to limiting oneself, not just geographically, but also emotionally. That there’s a certain depth of experience and meaning that can only be achieved when one picks a single piece of creation and says, “This is it. This is where I belong.”
  • The self is highly adaptable to its external environment, and ironically, the more you change your external environment, the more you lose track of who you actually are, because there’s nothing solid to compare yourself against. With frequent travel, so many variables in your life are changing that it’s hard to isolate a control variable and see the effect everything else has on it. You are in a constant state of upheaval.
  • Because uncertainty breeds skepticism, it breeds openness, and it breeds non-judgment. Because uncertainty helps you to grow and evolve.
Castillo de San Felipe in Cartagena, Colombia

Castillo de San Felipe in Cartagena, Colombia (Christine Lai)

WHY DON’T AMERICANS TAKE VACATION? Many people chasing the American Dream are working long hours and skipping vacation to reach it. Most employees strongly believe, compared with people in other countries, that hard work pays off in success. Americans who work over 40 hours a week are more happy than those who work less – so are they happy being overworked? Europeans, on the other hand, are different – they seem to value leisure time more, and accordingly those who work over 40 hours are less happy than those working less.