Author: CLAI

World traveler, explorer of cultures & societies. Wine beer food enthusiast. Lover of language, books, and art. Management consultant: turning ideas into action.

Wine by Prison Inmates & Cuisine by Camera

Curated by CLAI

KILLER WINE BY THE MAFIA: 18 miles off Tuscany’s coast, Gorgona is Italy’s last island prison – where its inmates serving 30-year sentences for murders and serious crimes make the region’s best wines.

  • “In other prisons I was locked up for 22 hours a day in a cell 2-by-3 yards wide. Here I’m outdoors from morning to night.” Prinzi, who’s 43, is serving a 25-year sentence for murder.
  • Gorgona Prison director Carlo Mazzerbo is a staunch environmentalist who says Gorgona is an ideal place to discuss issues such as organic farming, vegetarianism and animal rights. He believes inmates should be encouraged to take part in the dialogue.
  • Wine writers chatter and mingle with prison guards and inmates as long-stemmed glasses are filled with an amber-colored liquid. Marchesi de’ Frescobaldi is hosting a wine-tasting under a pergola on a terrace overlooking the sea.
  • Frescobaldi has signed a 15-year winemaking agreement with Gorgona. And he says he’s willing to hire some of these workers once they’re released.
Italian Wine by Inmates

Marquise Lamberto Frescobaldi (right), of the winemaking dynasty, talks with prisoners Brian Baldissin (left) and Francesco Papa at his vineyard on Gorgona island (NPR)

CAMERA CUISINE: A side effect of the digital age in food photography, camera cuisine is any dish that was inspired by a picture or aspires to be one. “It’s become a visual medium. We’re eating with our eyes first.” Digital food photography is a cheap marketing tool as well. A snapshot of a new dish uploaded last night can cause a bump in reservations this afternoon.

Digital Food Photography

Digital Food Photography (NYTIMES)

Stressed Out?

Curated by CLAI

STRESSED OUT: Women are more stressed out than men in every category – too many responsibilities, finances, work, health, neighbors – except for friends.

  • 18-29 year olds are most stressed out by “too many responsibilities.” 30-39 year-olds most stressed about finances. 65+ year-olds are least stressed out by their looks.
  • 70% of people respond to extreme stress by sleeping less than usual.
  • 83% of 18-29 year olds say stress has a positive effect in their lives – the highest in all age groups.
Sources of Stress by Age Group

Sources of Stress by Age Group (NPR)

PARENTING AROUND THE WORLD: Dutch parents believe strongly in not pushing their children too hard. “People would talk about a cousin who got a PhD and was very unhappy because there were no jobs at universities, and said that you shouldn’t teach your child to read before they got to school, because then your child would be bored at school and not have any friends.”

 

Modern Man and College Gentrification

Curated by CLAI

MODERN MAN: Because men take longer to finish college and marry later than women, they are more likely to stick around their parents’ house. In 2012, 40% of millennial men (ages 18-31) lived at home. American men earn about 19% more than women.

Adults Age 25-34 Living At Home (1983-2013)

Adults Age 25-34 Living At Home 1983-2013 (Alyson Hurt/NPR)

COLLEGE GRAD GENTRIFICATION: The more college grads, the more expensive the city, the more gentrification – less crime, better school, better restaurants, bars, museums, and art galleries. College graduates also live in the nicest cities in the country. They’re getting more benefits, even net of fact that they’re paying higher housing costs.

  • In 1980, a college graduate earned about 38% more than a worker with only a high-school diploma. By 2000, 57%. By 2011, 73%.
  • Nationwide education gentrification is at the scale of entire cities. Picture low-skilled workers increasingly excluded from Washington and San Francisco and segregated into cities like Toledo or Baton Rouge.
  • In the past, higher-wage cities attracted more workers, driving up the supply of labor and driving down the high wages that drew them to those cities in the first place, counteracting some of the inequality we see today.
  • A higher share of college graduates also yielded higher wages for workers without college degrees, likely because employers have to pay them more to keep them in higher-cost cities.

 

Hear Hot v. Cold Water? Wanna Share the Leftovers?

Curated by CLAI

HEARING HOT V. COLD: Can you hear the difference between hot and cold water? Most people can.

  • Cold water is more viscous than hot water, because the molecules are wiggling less rapidly, so they are effectively stickier. How viscous a liquid is affects how it pours, and therefore how it sounds.
  • Bubbliness is also a factor. There tends to be more bubbling in a liquid that’s hot. As you have more bubbling, you tend to get higher frequency sounds from it.
Hearing Temperature Differences

Hearing Temperature Differences (NPR)

LEFTOVERS? You can share it. With an app.

  • HUNGARY: Picniq  allows users share what they are cooking and eating — and for users to share in those meals.
  • GREECE: Cookisto began as a way to connect home cooks with busy people looking for a hot meal.
  • GERMANY: Foodsharing.de allows its 43,000 users to share surplus food in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.
  • ITALY: Ratatouille allows users to post their extra food in their “fridge” in the app for others to claim and arrange drop-off points.

Generational Differences in Savings and Politics

Curated by CLAI

MILLENNIAL SAVE MORE: Millennials are more likely to have at least five months of living expenses saved. They tend to have lower expenses. They don’t have to put away as much because they are likely living at home with their parents or have roommates.

30 and 49 are more likely than any other age group to not have an emergency fund because those are the years they have a house, two or three kids and a dog. But they need the emergency savings more than anybody.”

Politics by Age

Politics by Age (NYTIMES)

POLITICS BY BIRTH YEAR: Events at age 18 are about three times as powerful as those at age 40, according to the model.

  • Silent Generation (1941): By the time Eisenhower left office in 1961, people born in the early 1940s had accumulated pro-Republican sentiment that would last their entire lifetimes.
  • Baby Boomers (1952): Childhoods and formative years under Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon left them relatively pro-Democratic.